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SCIENCE AND NATURE

The Red Planet will cross directly in front of one the sky's most iconic star clusters this week. Watch it happen in binoculars.
A big star blew up in the galaxy M101 located 21 million light-years away, and it's bright enough to see in a modest telescope.
Lawmakers adjourn after making โ€œhistoricโ€ improvements for the environment and outdoor recreation.
Honeybee hovers over a flowering crab blossom

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With solar activity continuing to increase, auroras are becoming more frequent. Here's an alert app you don't want to be without.
How a rollicking river left its mark on the Red Planet. We also look ahead to the return of the young moon at dusk.
On May 16 Mars aligns with Gemini's two brightest stars. The following morning a wafer-thin moon covers up the planet Jupiter.
With Venus as tour guide, skywatchers can spot a bright star cluster in Gemini. Although the recent aurora failed to show, another blast is on the way for May 10-11.
Solar mischief could make for a great northern lights show. But how to avoid the clouds? There's an app for that.
Astronomers have long suspected stars eat planets when they swell up into giants. Now we have proof. Also, see the full moon and a meteor shower this week.

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The new deal requires that any logging be based on โ€œsound wildlife biology.โ€
A calendar of May's best naked-eye, astronomical sights.
Volunteers improve habitat in hopes sharp-tailed grouse will return.

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