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TRUE CRIME

The police file from this case, recently obtained by Forum News Service, reveals what Bismarck Police Department found when it reinvestigated the case of Sandra and John Jacobson: an initial missing persons investigation that left key questions unanswered, vital evidence unaccounted for and potential suspects cut loose.
The disappearance of Eric Haider plagued Dickinson for three years. What began as a missing persons investigation, soured by allegations of police indifference and ineptitude, evolved slowly from hopes of a triumphant return to the discovery of his body buried alive. Questions remain on the circumstances surrounding the death of Eric Haider.
In the latest update from the Dakota Spotlight podcast's Season 5: A Better Search for Barbara Cotton, host James Wolner interviews a someone who may have seen the 15-year-old girl, gone missing from Williston, North Dakota, in 1981.
On Oct. 1, 1981, the body of 68-year-old Clifton Wendell Marsh, of Hope, Michigan, was found at a rest area on Highway 2 east of Devils Lake.

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A seemingly happy family ended in tragedy after the father bludgeoned his wife to death, suffocated his 9-year- and 22-month-old children, lit his house on fire and then hanged himself 38 years ago.
Forensic psychologist Frank F. Weber’s latest true-crime thriller, “Black and Blue,” is about the search for the killer of 19-year-old Sadie Sullivan. The Pierz resident will speak at Roundhouse Brewery in Nisswa and sign books at CatTale's Books & Gifts in downtown Brainerd.
When a person goes missing, law enforcement is often stuck in a problematic position. Without a body, it can be difficult to prove a crime existed. That means justice, however obvious it may seem, is often not achieved. For the 2001 missing persons case of Pamela Dunn, that’s not exactly the story.
A family of boaters discovered the baby on Sept. 5, 2011. While they believed they were picking trash from the water, they discovered a baby wrapped inside a tote bag.
All Nathan Williams is known to have had with him when he left on his trip are two fishing rods and a single shot Harrington & Richardson 12-gauge shotgun, in case he saw a grouse. He was wearing blue jeans and a black T-shirt. He didn't even have a sleeping bag — just a blue down comforter from his bed.
Special agent recounts his investigation into Michael Swango, the doctor who killed his patients

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When a gunman killed a police officer in Hope, North Dakota, in 1933, the county sheriff wasn't about to take it lying down. He persisted to track the suspect for two years over seven states and thousands of miles -- one of the most highly publicized manhunts in U.S. history.
In the last scheduled episode of this season, Dakota Spotlight pulls back the curtain on the decades of pain, loss and questions suffered — often in silence — by those who knew and loved Kristin Diede and Bob Anderson, two Minnesotans gone missing in North Dakota in August 1993.
After a 1933 bank robbery in Okabena, Minnesota two theories emerged about the culprits. Initially thought to be the work of famed outlaws Bonnie and Clyde, three locals were arrested and convicted of the crime -- but one researcher is certain they didn't do it.

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